Is Shoulder Tendonitis a Vaccine Injury?

Shoulder tendonitis is a common condition that can have a variety of different causes. While traumatic accidents and overuse are the most common causes, shoulder tendonitis can also result from errors during vaccine administration. If you’ve been diagnosed with shoulder tendonitis following a vaccination, you may have a vaccine injury claim, and you should consult with a vaccine injury attorney about your rights under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP).

How Do Vaccinations Cause Shoulder Tendonitis?

Shoulder tendonitis results not from an adverse reaction to a vaccine ingredient, but rather from an error during the vaccination process. It happens when the medical professional who administers a vaccine uses a needle of the wrong size or inserts the needle in the wrong location or at the wrong angle. As a result, shoulder tendonitis is a risk with all intramuscular and subcutaneous injections—including the flu shot and most other CDC-recommended vaccinations.

When Can You File a Vaccine Injury Claim for Shoulder Tendonitis?

Filing a vaccine injury claim for shoulder tendonitis requires proof that the first symptom or other “manifestation of onset” appeared within 48 hours of vaccination. While it is possible to file a claim if symptoms appeared later in some cases, there are additional steps involved, and most vaccine recipients will begin to experience symptoms within 48 hours. Typically, the first symptom is pain or tenderness, and swelling, stiffness and loss of mobility will usually soon follow.

How Do You File a Vaccine Injury Claim for Shoulder Tendonitis?

There are several steps involved in filing a vaccine injury claim for shoulder tendonitis. Some of the most important steps include:

  • Seeking a Diagnosis and Treatment – To seek financial compensation for shoulder tendonitis under the VICP, it is necessary to obtain a formal diagnosis. It is also important to follow your doctor’s treatment advice and to rest and rehabilitate as necessary.
  • Keeping All Relevant Documentation – Be sure to keep your vaccination record, any medical records you receive related to your shoulder tendonitis, and any records you receive from your employer if you miss time from work. All of these will be important evidence in support of your vaccine injury claim.
  • Keeping Track of the Dayto-Day Effects of Your Tendonitis – In addition to compensation for medical bills, other out-of-pocket costs and lost wages, the VICP also pays financial compensation for eligible vaccine recipients’ pain and suffering. Documenting the day-to-day effects of your tendonitis will help with calculating the full value of your claim.
  • Speaking with a Vaccine Injury Attorney – As soon as possible, you should discuss your VICP claim with an attorney. An experienced vaccine injury attorney will be able to help with all aspects of your claim, help you avoid costly mistakes, and help you decide when (and if) to accept a settlement.  

Schedule a Free Consultation with a Vaccine Injury Attorney

If you believe you may have a vaccine injury claim for shoulder tendonitis, we encourage you to schedule an appointment at the Law Offices of Leah V. Durant, PLLC. To discuss your claim with a vaccine injury attorney in confidence as soon as possible, call 202-800-1711 or request a free consultation online now.

Leah Durant Bio

Experienced litigation attorney Leah Durant focuses on representing clients in complex vaccine litigation matters. Leah Durant is the owner and principal attorney of the Law Offices of Leah V. Durant, PLLC, a litigation firm based in Washington, DC. Leah Durant and her staff represent clients and their families who suffer from vaccine-related injuries, adverse vaccine reactions and vaccine-related deaths. The Law Offices of Leah V. Durant, PLLC is dedicated to assisting individuals in recovering the highest level of compensation as quickly and efficiently as possible. To learn more, contact vaccine attorney Leah Durant today.



Categories: Shoulder Tendonitis

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