HPV Vaccination Rates Among Teens are Increasing

According to a report from Medpage Today, human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates among teens have increased significantly over the past five years. The report, which cites data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), states that the percentage of teens who received at least one dose of the HPV vaccine increased from 60.4 percent to 65.5 percent from 2016 to 2017 (a 7.7 percent increase), and that “HPV vaccination coverage [has] increased an average of 5.1 percentage points annually since 2013.”

While this is an improvement, HPV vaccination rates among teens still remain relatively low. For example, according to the report, the teen vaccination rate against meningitis was 85.1 percent in 2017, and the vaccination rate for tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis (using the Tdap vaccine) was 88.7 percent.

The CDC Recommends HPV Vaccination at Age 11 or 12

The CDC recommends administration of the HPV vaccine at age 11 or 12 with two doses of the vaccine administered at least six months apart. Teens can receive the HPV vaccine if they were not fully immunized prior to age 13. As summarized by the CDC:

“Human papillomavirus is a common virus. HPV is most common in people in their teens and early 20s. About 14 million people, including teens, become infected with HPV each year. HPV infection can cause cervical, vaginal, and vulvar cancers in women and penile cancer in men. HPV can also cause anal cancer, oropharyngeal cancer (back of the throat), and genital warts in both men and women.”

Gardasil 9 is the current FDA-approved HPV vaccine. It is administered by intramuscular (IM) injection in the deltoid muscle below the shoulder.

Health Risks Associated with HPV Vaccination

Like all FDA-approved vaccines, the HPV vaccine is considered relatively safe for the majority of the population, and the CDC states that the risks of side effects and vaccine-related injuries are outweighed by the benefits of vaccination in most cases. Common symptoms include headache, pain and redness at the injection site, muscle and joint pain, fever, vomiting, abdominal symptoms, and fatigue, while some vaccine recipients may experience more-severe effects such as fainting and allergic reactions.

Another risk associated with the HPV vaccine – and all IM vaccines – is the risk of a shoulder injury related to vaccine administration (SIRVA). These are injuries that result from errors during a vaccine injection, such as using a wrong-size needle or inserting the needle too high on the shoulder or too low on the arm. Types of SIRVA include adhesive capsulitis (frozen shoulder), brachial neuritis, shoulder bursitis and tendonitis, and symptoms range from short-term pain and stiffness to chronic pain and loss of mobility.

Has your child experienced shoulder pain following an HPV vaccination? Learn about your family’s legal rights under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP).

Contact Vaccine Injury Lawyer Leah V. Durant

If you would like more information about filing a claim under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP) for SIRVA or another injury resulting from an HPV immunization, we encourage you to contact us for a free, no-obligation consultation. To discuss your claim with national vaccine injury lawyer Leah V. Durant, please call 202-800-1711 or request an appointment online today.

Leah Durant Bio

Experienced litigation attorney Leah Durant focuses on representing clients in complex vaccine litigation matters. Leah Durant is the owner and principal attorney of the Law Offices of Leah V. Durant, PLLC, a litigation firm based in Washington, DC. Leah Durant and her staff represent clients and their families who suffer from vaccine-related injuries, adverse vaccine reactions and vaccine-related deaths. The Law Offices of Leah V. Durant, PLLC is dedicated to assisting individuals in recovering the highest level of compensation as quickly and efficiently as possible. To learn more, contact vaccine attorney Leah Durant today.

 



Categories: Human Papilloma Virus

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